How Green Roofs Can Help To Combat The Dangers of Flooding

Spring and summer have been among the wettest on record in eastern North America. And the world is watching Houston this week, where the remains of Hurricane Harvey have caused devastating flooding.

Rainfall amounts in the spring broke records in places like Toronto, where 44.6 millimetres of rain fell in 24 hours. The downpours earlier this spring caused the stormwater infrastructure in Canada’s biggest city to overflow, leading to flooding of busy downtown streets.

Rapid Loss of Permeable Surfaces

Urbanisation in many North American cities has led to a rapid loss of permeable surfaces where water can freely drain. Coupled with the growing downtown core population in cities Toronto, this means that the stormwater and sewer systems in place must manage more water than in previous decades.

Furthermore, global temperature increases have been linked to the rise in extreme weather events worldwide, a trend that could worsen if global warming is not brought under control.

Many cities are ill-equipped to deal with these unprecedented amounts of precipitation due to their insufficient and outdated stormwater infrastructure.

Using Green Roofs To Help Manage Storm Water

Green roofs are a green infrastructure (GI) option that can be applied to virtually any rooftop given weight load capacity. The benefits of green roofs extend far beyond their obvious aesthetic appeal.*

The benefits of constructing a green roof include:

  • Improving the local environment by providing wildlife habitats
  • Absorbing CO2, pollution and particulates from the atmosphere
  • Improving sound and vibration insulation
  • Improving thermal insulation
  • Reducing the amount and speed of rainwater run-off by around 50% and forming part of a SUDS design
  • Reducing the “heat island” effect in built up areas and helping to improve air quality and environment
  • Protecting the structure and waterproofing membrane from:
    • UV light and heat form the sun
    • impact and abrasion
    • environmental elements including extremes of temperature
    • plant and bird infestation
  • Ballasting inverted waterproofing systems
  • Optimising the structural footprint by:
    • Increasing space – providing new and attractive natural amenity areas
    • Adding floor space in often high density developments
    • Adding focal points
    • Decreasing energy costs
    • Increasing value of the development
    • Properties with green roofs sell / rent faster rate than naked buildings
  • Making the planning process easier
  • Money saving

To help with this, Wallbarn presents the new M-Tray® for 2019 which has been further improved to make sedum roofs easier to install with less disruption to both the plants and the structure.

Our bespoke design allows us to supply the best quality vegetation to site. The fully established, mature sedum or wildflower plants, are contained within easy-to-carry trays which click together to form an almost invisible join.

For more on the new M-Tray®, please visit the dedicated area of the site by clicking here or contact us directly on Tel. No. 0208 916 2222.

 

*For more on this story, please click here.

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General Benefits of Green Roofs – Biodiversity

It is now well documented that green roofs play a key role in helping to create biodiversity by providing important refuges for wildlife in urban areas.

A recent study by Sydney Marie Gonsalves at the Portland State University outlined the following in their introduction:

Green Roofs and Urban Biodiversity: Their Role as Invertebrate Habitat and the Effect of Design on Beetle Community

“With over half the world’s population now living in cities, urban areas represent one of earth’s few ecosystems that are increasing in extent and are sites of altered biogeochemical cycles, habitat fragmentation, and changes in biodiversity. However, urban green spaces, including green roofs, can also provide important pools of biodiversity and contribute to regional gamma diversity, while novel species assemblages can enhance some ecosystem services. Green roofs may also mitigate species loss in urban areas and have been shown to support a surprising diversity of invertebrates, including rare and endangered species. In the first part of this study I reviewed the literature on urban invertebrate communities and diversity to better understand the role of green roofs in providing habitat in the context of the larger urban mosaic. My review concluded that, while other factors such as surrounding land use and connectivity are also important to specific invertebrate taxa, local habitat variables contribute substantially to the structure and diversity of urban invertebrate communities. The importance of local habitat variables in urban green spaces and strong support for the habitat complexity hypothesis in a number of other ecosystems has led to proposals that “biodiverse” roofs— those intentionally designed with varied substrate depth, greater plant diversity, or added elements such as logs or stones—would support greater invertebrate diversity, but there is currently limited peer-reviewed data to support this.”

“In order to address the habitat complexity hypothesis in the context of green roofs, in the second part of this study I surveyed three roofs designed primarily for stormwater management, three biodiverse roofs, and five ground-level green spaces, from March until September of 2014 in the Portland metropolitan area. Beetles (Coleoptera) were sampled bi-weekly as representatives of total species diversity. Biodiverse roofs had greater richness, abundance, and diversity of beetle species compared to stormwater roofs, but were not more diverse than ground sites. Both biodiverse roofs and ground sites had approximately 20% native beetle species while stormwater roofs had only 5%. Functional diversity was also higher on biodiverse roofs with an average of seven trophic groups represented, while stormwater roofs averaged only three. Ground sites, biodiverse roofs, and stormwater roofs each grouped distinctively in terms of beetle community composition and biodiverse roof communities were found to be positively correlated with roof age, percent plant cover, average plant height, and plant species richness. These results support the findings of previous studies on the importance of local variables in structuring urban invertebrate communities and suggest that biodiverse design can reliably increase green roof diversity, with
the caution that they remain no replacement for ground-level conservation.”

To read the full report, please click here.

How Can The M-Tray® Help?

Our bespoke design allows us to supply the best quality vegetation to site. The fully established, mature sedum or wildflower plants, are contained within easy-to-carry trays which click together to form an almost invisible join.

M-Tray® has been designed and developed by Wallbarn in the UK and is the subject of Community Registered Design (No. 002953943-0001) and US Design (Application No. 29/553,129).

To visit the dedicated area of the site, please click here.

Contact Us

Wallbarn can advise and assist on all aspects of scoping, installing and maintaining your green roof project.

Just pick up the phone, ask a question using the live chat facility on this site or send us an email at info@wallbarn.com and we’ll get back to you next working day at the latest.

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Overlaying Decking or Complete Reconstruction?

An image of a decking overlay|Timber Decking Installation Image (Before & After)|decking in a line on patio

When looking to install a new deck, the decision on whether to overlay an existing deck/paving structure or rip it up and start afresh can be a complex one.

Whilst many people automatically assume their only option is to remove everything from the original installation, with factors such as time and expense to consider, exploring alternatives can pay off in a variety of ways.

Resurfacing Your Deck

Resurfacing an existing structure with decking or paving offers a number of advantages including:

  • Removing the need to dig fresh foundations
  • Creating the chance to implement effective waterproofing solutions
  • Save time and money during installation
  • No creation of waste & no issues with waste disposal

By using timber tiles on top of free-standing pedestals which are installed on top of the existing structure, we are able to ensure that the new tiles are kept clear from excess standing water which might make them warp.

This, in turn, will leave space underneath the freshly installed tiles for cables, pipework and outlets and as tiles aren’t fixed to the pedestals, access can be gained simply by lifting a tile.

Natural, Attractive Finish of Timber Decking

By using suspended Wallbarn Timber Paving Tiles, installers combine the natural, attractive finish of timber decking with the speed and ease of laying paving slabs.

Traditionally laying timber decking directly onto these deck surfaces led to additional costs of employing specialist carpenters. Laying timber joists directly onto the waterproofing membrane also risked damage over time. Wallbarn Timber Paving Tiles offer the ideal solution. The weight of the tile will hold the system in place.

Suspended System

This suspended system avoids having to fix anything onto the deck and lifts all the timber away from any standing water, avoiding the dangers of a slippery surface.

As everything is free standing, the tiles can be taken up and replaced without disrupting the whole area, should the deck need to be inspected. Unsightly items such as drainage outlets, cables and pipes can be hidden beneath the tiles and accessed easily.

Achieving Stunning Finishes

Stunning finishes can be achieved. The tiles can be laid in a straight-line pattern or in a “chess board” style, depending on the client’s wishes. We have a range of different timber available sourced from South America, chosen for their beauty and durability including Ipe and Cumaru.

We can also supply FSC® certified timber as we have FSC® Chain of Custody (please speak to your Wallbarn representative).

Click Here To View Our Range of Hardwood Timber Decking Tiles

Should The Installation of Green Roofs Be Made Mandatory?

An image of a completed M-Tray green roof installation in Sydenham

From Copenhagen to San Francisco, from Toronto to Singapore (and many more), locations across the globe have introduced legislation requiring the installation of green roofs on new commercial, institutional and multi-family residential developments.

Offering a number of proven benefits, it’s not difficult to see why. The benefits of constructing a green roof include:

  • Improving the local environment by providing wildlife habitats
  • Absorbing CO2, pollution and particulates from the atmosphere
  • Improving sound and vibration insulation
  • Improving thermal insulation
  • Reducing the amount and speed of rainwater run-off by around 50% and forming part of a SUDS design
  • Reducing the“heat island” effect in built-up areas and helping to improve air quality and environment

Protecting the structure and waterproofing membrane from:

  • UV light and heat from the sun
  • Ballasting inverted waterproofing systems

Optimising the structural footprint by:

  • Increasing space – providing new and attractive natural amenity areas
  • Adding floor space in often high-density developments
  • Adding focal points
  • Decreasing energy costs
  • Increasing the value of the development
  • Properties with green roofs sell/rent faster than naked buildings
  • Making the planning process easier
  • Money saving

With so many benefits and an increasing number of locations following suit, the question has to be asked, why aren’t more governments and councils taking steps to make the installation of green roofs to certain new developments mandatory?

The UK green roof industry has grown beyond all recognition over the past few years but it is still telling that a significant proportion of green roofs in the UK have been installed in the Greater London area.

This is highlighted on the Mayor of London/London Assembly website which can be accessed via the link below:

https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/environment/parks-green-spaces-and-biodiversity/green-roof-map

Taking Additional Steps

Introducing a requirement for green roofs to be installed as part of standard planning policies would be a huge step in the right direction. However, the case for retrofitting green roofs to existing buildings must also be made. Developers and architects would then be able to factor this into their plans as a necessity rather than an optional extra.

Please Note – Whilst the theory behind introducing this type of legislation is absolutely rock solid, it’s crucial that everyone buys into the spirit of the intentions. Trying to cheat the system by including a substandard green roof into plans just to help gain successful planning permission is not going to help achieve any type of sustainable change.

* “Amsterdam launched a green roof incentives programme in 2009 offering subsidies to owners to install green roofs. Return on investment have been demonstrated within 2-6 years with the quickest payback being seen from roofs providing a degree of access, despite the higher initial costs.

Similarly, New York passed legislation in 2008 to provide a one-year tax abatement for green roof installation covering at least 50% of the roof.”

*https://www.placenorthwest.co.uk/news/comment-should-green-roofs-be-mandatory/

With urbanisation reaching an all-time high, the time for change is now. Targeting new developments and existing structures with green roofing legislation can help to create a significant change offering wide-ranging benefits.

What makes the M-Tray® unique?

Offering the ideal solution for application to all types of building, our M-Tray® has been specifically designed to make sedum roof installation quick and easy – with minimum disruption to the plants and the structure they are going onto – and to provide a seamless, verdant finish – an instant and sustainable green roof.

  • deep cavities for healthy roots
  • optimum drainage means stronger plants
  • established vegetation at point of installation
  • 100mm deep substrate for the longevity of plant life
  • no sharp edges or mess, less risk to membrane
  • click-together trays create a seamless connection
  • easy to transport and install

We only supply fully-established, mature sedum plants contained within our easy-to-carry M-Trays® which click together to form an almost invisible join.

Please Click Here For More Information About The M-Tray® Modular Green Roof

Why Don’t More Buildings Have Green Roofs?

An image of a completed green roof installation

A recent article in the Conversation raised an interesting point. If green roofs improve the urban environment – why don’t all buildings have them?

Thankfully, the answer to this question can be viewed far more positively than just a few years ago as a recent report in the UK suggested that the green roof market there is expanding at a rate of 17% each year.

A Growing Trend

Whilst the UK is still relatively new to developing green roofs, it is significant that governments and institutions are playing a major role in helping to promote the benefits.

London is central to the UK’s green roof market, with forward-thinking policies such as the 2019 London Plan, helping to play a pivotal role. With outstanding initiatives such as this in place, recent history has seen the areas covered by green roofs more than double in England’s capital city.

Although London is currently leading the way, this is not to say that other cities are being left behind. There are now “living labs” at the Universities of Sheffield and Salford which are helping to establish the precedent elsewhere.

The IGNITION project – led by the Greater Manchester Combined Authority – involves the development of a living lab at the University of Salford, with the aim of uncovering ways to convince developers and investors to adopt green roofs.

For more on this story, please visit the Conversation website by clicking here.

Creating an Instant Green Roof

The M-Tray® offers the chance to install an instant green roof. Since the sedum is less shocked by the installation process, as soon as the trays are connected together the whole area is filled with well-established plants. They will start to grow straight away, forming a seamless layer of vegetation much faster.

Not only are our M-Trays® easy to install and transport, but they will also last in the long term. Every now and again throughout the year, you will need to do some maintenance e.g. weeding but apart from that, our trays are designed to be as self-sufficient as possible (they are designed to capture rainwater, releasing it gradually feeding the species set into our special substrate).

Speed is also a major factor. It has been proven that green roofs constructed using M-Tray® are installed much faster than in traditional roll-out methods.

Access to the roof is future-proofed. If there are problems with the deck beneath or inspection is required, one M-Tray® or section can easily be lifted out without disruption to the whole roof.

Click Here For More On The M-Tray® Modular Green Roof System

Reducing Surface Runoff With Green Roofs

A close-up of completed M-Tray green roof installation in Hammersmith

The benefits of green roofs extend far beyond their obvious aesthetic appeal.

As we face prolonged spells of wet weather,  green roofs are proven to play a key role in helping to significantly reduce the surface runoff volumes and rates of rainfall leaving roofs.

As a proven control mechanism in the SuDS (Sustainable Drainage Systems), green roofs can help to effectively combat the potential for flash floods as a consequence of intense rainfall events.

This excellent video from the STRi Group highlights how green infrastructure can be used to help store stormwater on sites.

What are SuDS and how do they work?

In urban areas where many surfaces are sealed by buildings and paving, natural infiltration is limited. Instead, drainage networks consisting of pipes and culverts, divert surface water to local watercourses. In some cases, this has resulted in downstream flooding and deterioration in river water quality caused when foul sewers are overwhelmed by surface water leading to a release of dirty water into rivers.

Sustainable drainage systems aim to alleviate these problems by storing or re-using surface water at the source, by decreasing flow rates to watercourses and by improving water quality.

Please click here for more on SuDS and their benefits from the British Geological Survey.

How Can Green Roofs Help?

Green infrastructure technologies, such as permeable pavements, bioswales, cisterns and green roofs, are now commonly recommended to confront extreme weather events.

Green roofs are a green infrastructure (GI) option that can be applied to virtually any rooftop given weight load capacity. The benefits of green roofs extend far beyond their obvious aesthetic appeal.

A study done by University of Toronto civil engineer Jenny Hill and co-researchers at the school’s Green Roof Innovation Testing Lab (GRIT Lab) showed that green roofs have the capacity to capture an average of 70 per cent of rainfall over a given time, relieving underground storm-water systems and releasing the rainwater back into the atmosphere.

Introducing The M-Tray®

Wallbarn presents the new M-Tray® which has been further improved to make sedum roofs easier to install with less disruption to both the plants and the structure. M-Tray® is also designed to give a more seamless, verdant finish and an instant green roof.

Wallbarn is at the forefront of developments in the green roofing sector and has always provided products that combine top-quality ingredients with user-friendly, hassle-free maintenance. The purpose of M-Tray® is to enhance rooftop living

Wallbarn can advise and assist on all aspects of scoping, installing and maintaining your green roof project.

Just pick up the phone, ask a question using the live chat facility on this site or send us an email at info@wallbarn.com and we’ll get back to you next working day at the latest.

Changes In Fire Safety Regulations For Balconies

Wallbarn is working at Riverlight in Vauxhall

New legislation was introduced on 21st December 2018 which specifically relates to the fire requirements of external balconies in England and Wales.

For the first time, balconies are now counted as part of the external wall; and classified as a “specified attachment”.

For building works which commenced after 20th February 2019 the following now applies:

The construction of either :

new buildings which are:

  • over 18m, and
  • in which people sleep; or

for the refurbishment of existing buildings where:

  • changing the cladding would result in lower safety (ie recladding over concrete), or
  • the building is changing in use

then the new legislation indicates that all components of the wall must be individually tested as non-combustible (European Classification A2-s1, d0 (limited combustibility material) or A1).

Significantly there is no longer the ability to test a complete wall (or therefore balcony) system using BS8414.

Making the Adjustment

At Wallbarn, we are pro-actively reacting to the changes in fire safety regulations to ensure compliance with our products.

Based upon our ASP design to help distribute weight effectively, we are currently developing a steel adjustable pedestal which is due for launch in quarter one of 2020.

Stay tuned for details…….

What do A1 and A2 ratings mean?*

The government’s official guide to rules on fire safety – Approved Document B – defines products achieving an A1 classification as non-combustible and products achieving an A2 classification as being of limited combustibility. A-class products – those classified A1 and A2 – make no significant contribution to fire growth while products with a rating of B-F are classified as combustible.

The European Classification system for combustibility classifies construction products using a series of tests. Class A materials have the best performance in a fire and are divided into two sub-classes, Class A1 and Class A2.

Class A1 – Products are described as having no contribution to fire at any stage. The BS EN 13501 test sets several thresholds for combustion performance when tested to both EN ISO 1716 and EN ISO 1182. One of these thresholds is a maximum heat of combustion of 2MJ/kg. Typical products meeting this classification include most inorganic materials such as metal, stone, and glass.

Class A2 – Products are described as having no significant contribution to fire at any stage. BS EN 13501 sets several thresholds for combustion when tested to EN ISO 1182, or both EN ISO 1716 and EN 13823. One of these thresholds is a maximum heat of combustion of 3MJ/kg. A typical product meeting this classification is plasterboard.

An A2 certified product has higher combustibility and can sustain flame for no more than 20 seconds. In contrast, A1 has lower combustibility and no sustained flaming when tested.

*These definitions were taken from the Architects Journal, please click here for the full details.

Combating Stormwater Threat with Green Roofs

An image of a green roof installation on a house

A fascinating article in the Huffington Post recently highlighted the positive impact the installation of a green roofing system can have in regards to effectively combating excess rainfall.

Southern California has been exposed to one of the worse droughts on record and despite a little respite with rain beginning to fall, thoughts have turned towards implementing long term measures designed to help limit the negative impact of extreme weather.

The article stated that:

“One of the best strategies for improving the city’s resilience and water efficiency is to mimic the way undisturbed environments receive rain and adjust the built landscape to reflect qualities found in nature. Prior to urbanization, the land that is now Los Angeles could easily absorb 95% of the rain that fell. Today, stormwater floods the city with polluted water–wreaks expensive havoc–and then disappears into the ocean.”

“Living roofs (aka green roofs) contribute to resilience in many other ways. Not only do they absorb and filter rainwater during storms, but they also reduce ambient temperatures during heat waves (which are projected to increase over the coming decades), through the process of natural evaporation.  Drought tolerant plants grown on the roof provide insulation in summer and winter, keeping living spaces comfortable and reducing energy costs. Green roofs also pull carbon dioxide out of the air; they actively absorb one of the agents driving climate change in the first place.”

To read the full article, please click here.

Wallbarn Green Roofing Systems

Wallbarn have specialised in the growth and installation of green roofing systems for many years and have actively promoted the wide-ranging benefits to our customers.

For more on the benefits of installing a green roofing system, please visit the dedicated area on our website by clicking here.

Along with offering wide ranging environmental benefits, the green roofing products available from Wallbarn are also incredibly easy to install.

 

“Wildflower” Green Roofs – All You Need To Know

Wildflower Green Roofs

There is a lot of chatter about “wildflower” green roofs and throughout this post, we aim to shine a light on what separates wildflower green roofs from standard green roofs.

What Are Wildflower Green Roofs?

Wildflower or biodiverse green roofs are supposed to contain a mixture of native flower species to attract native insects and birds. However, if you were to prepare a green roof substrate of bare earth and introduce a few native flowers after a period of time the roof will become overrun with grass and very invasive weeds such as goat willow, bindweed and nettles. The result after time will be unsightly and potentially dangerous for the membrane beneath.

Staying Ahead of The Curve

To complement our wildflower green roof options, we are currently working on testing a wildflower M-Tray® mix with taller, more delicate flowers than standard sedum.

The winter is a crucial time to help address common issues such as re-seeding and transportation and the next few months will be essential in developing the most durable option possible.

Choosing The Correct Sedum

Many “wildflowers” are either annual or biennial, or have such large root structures that they are unsuitable for green roofs.

What to do? Wallbarn is offering a solution by using the standard sedum M-Tray® green roofs as a basis for our green roof and adding wildflower seeds. Our sedum mix, which is based on the Jellito “Northern European and English Mix” seed mix which that company supplies, contains native sedum species and those deemed suitable for the English climate. Many of these sedums are flowering, have different leaf structures and textures, and grow and retreat throughout the year.

Sedum is not just a green carpet. It has many different varieties and if it is planted up in the right manner, can produce an extremely complicated and attractive garden.

The Correct Way To Introduce The Wildflower Seed Mix

In order to get more wildflowers into the system, Wallbarn is broadcasting the sedum trays with a wildflower seed mix at the point of harvesting and packing.

If we planted up wildflower trays on the farm, the flowers would be crushed upon packing and would be dead by the time they were delivered. Therefore, the tray units will look like regular sedum trays when they are delivered. The seeds will start to germinate immediately and will start to appear as flowers within 3 weeks of delivery and watering (we recommend that the trays are watered once installed).

This seed mix is designed to attract bees and butterflies, so will increase the amount of nature on the roof.

“Wildflower” Green Roofs Need To Be Maintained

There are certain things to consider: these flowers are chiefly annuals, so will die off at the end of the growing season.

Therefore, in order to have flowers the next year, the roof will need to be reseeded. Either people can harvest the seeds in this season’s crop to sow the next year, or purchase another seed mix (available from Wallbarn) the next spring. Also, these wildflowers can grow very high, up to 80cm and will have much more fibrous structures than sedum (which is succulent) so the dead stalks and other vegetation will turn not rot but remain on the roof after the flowers have died off.

This makes the roof look unsightly and is also a potential fire risk, so these dead stalks should be removed every autumn. Clients should bear this additional maintenance in mind when choosing wildflower – if the roof is inaccessible this can prove a major problem. The additional costs of more maintenance should also be factored.

Need More Information?

More information on Green Roofs, can be found on our website.

If you would like to talk to us to discuss our green roof solutions, please contact us today on 0208 916 2222 or email sales@wallbarn.com.

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Wallbarn Reacting To Changes In Fire Safety Regulations

An image of a balcony

Some fundamental changes have been put in place relating to the fire safety rating of building materials during the addition of bolt-on balconies to buildings.

The ban, resulting from a consultation following the tragic events at Grenfell, was formally announced last year on the 1st October 2018  by Housing Secretary James Brokenshire during the Conservative party conference in Birmingham.

The policy will apply to all new buildings and those currently under construction but will not be applied retrospectively to buildings where the materials have already been fitted.

Previously, building regulations in the UK state that any material used for filler or insulation on high-rise buildings must be of ‘limited combustibility’.

However, these regulations will be amended so that only materials classed as ‘A1 or A2’ under the European Reaction to Fire classification system, will be allowed.

What does A1 and A2 rating mean?*

The government’s official guide to rules on fire safety – Approved Document B – defines products achieving an A1 classification as non-combustible and products achieving an A2 classification as being of limited combustibility. A-class products – those classified A1 and A2 – make no significant contribution to fire growth while products with a rating of B-F are classified as combustible.

The European Classification system for combustibility classifies construction products using a series of tests. Class A materials have the best performance in a fire and are divided into two sub-classes, Class A1 and Class A2.

Class A1 – Products are described as having no contribution to fire at any stage. The BS EN 13501 test sets several thresholds for combustion performance when tested to both EN ISO 1716 and EN ISO 1182. One of these thresholds is a maximum heat of combustion of 2MJ/kg. Typical products meeting this classification include most inorganic materials such as metal, stone, and glass.

Class A2, s3, d2 – Products are described as having no significant contribution to fire at any stage. BS EN 13501 sets several thresholds for combustion when tested to EN ISO 1182, or both EN ISO 1716 and EN 13823. One of these thresholds is a maximum heat of combustion of 3MJ/kg. A typical product meeting this classification is plasterboard.

An A2 certified product has higher combustibility and can sustain flame for no more than 20 seconds. In contrast, A1 has lower combustibility and no sustained flaming when tested.

*These definitions were taken from the Architects Journal, please click here for the full details.

Making the Adjustment

At Wallbarn, we are pro-actively reacting to the changes in fire safety regulations to ensure compliance with our products.

Based upon our ASP design to help distribute weight effectively, we are currently developing a steel adjustable pedestal which is due for launch in quarter one of 2020.

Stay tuned for details…….